Great Junction Street carriage renewal

(adapted from a notice from Edinburgh Council)

Click to download the full notice: GJS Residents Notification Letter.

This work is scheduled to commence on Monday 8th January 2018 and will last approximately 4 weeks depending on weather and other circumstances.

Traffic on Great Junction Street will be restricted to northbound only in order for the works to be carried out safely.

To facilitate this the following closures will be in place:

  • Great Junction Street from the Bonnington Road junction to North Junction Street/Ferry Road Junction to all vehicular traffic travelling south towards the foot of Leith Walk. North bound traffic towards North Junction Street will be maintained for the duration of the construction phase.
  • Cables Wynd from Yardheads to Great Junction Street will also be closed for the duration of the construction phase.

    The diversion route for south bound traffic that would normally travel along Great Junction Street is via Coburg Street, Sandport Place and Henderson Street, to arrive back at Great Junction Street.
    Traffic will be managed in and out of Mill Lane, Taylor Gardens and Ballantyne Road by the contractor. There will be left turn only policy for traffic exiting Bonnington Road, Bangor Road and Ballantyne Road for the duration of the works. There will be a right-turn only policy for traffic exiting Taylor Gardens and Mill Lane for the duration of the works.

    Parking suspensions will be in place to suspend waiting, loading and unloading on both sides of Great Junction Street from Bonnington Road junction to North Junction Street, Cables Wynd from Yardheads to Great Junction Street, King Street in its entirety, 25m west along Bonnington Road from GJS, and Coburgh Street in its entirety.

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Edinburgh 20mph Speed Limits  – Go Live

(adapted from a post on Tower Wharf Residents’ Association website. It is presumed that the original text came from Edinburgh Council.)

From Sunday 31 July, the legal speed limit in streets across much of Edinburgh’s city centre and rural west area will go down to 20mph, the first phase in a planned rollout of lower speeds across the Capital.

The new speed limits are designed to increase safety for all road users in Edinburgh as well as creating a calmer, more people-friendly environment in shopping and residential streets.  A network of key arterial roads across the city will be retained at 30mph and 40mph, resulting in a modest impact on journey times overall. Continue reading

Open data Edinburgh map – planning in context!

Greener Leith’s open data map of Edinburgh is now online at https://myleith.wordpress.com.

It brings several open datasets together in one place, including:

  • significant planned developments in the New Town & Broughton Community Council area (including links to the relevant documents on the CEC planning portal)
  • the wider urban planning context (housing land audit completions and schedule, local development plan, protected areas, listed buildings, open spaces, vacant and derelict land) Continue reading

George Street quarterly public stakeholder meeting minutes – 15 June 2015

(Ian MacPhail also emailed ‘It’s been a genuine attempt to put grassroots stakeholders in charge. The fact there has been standing room only has been a testimony to how engaged people are.

Minutes of George Street Quarterly Public Stakeholder Meeting

Date – 15 June 2015, Venue – West Drawing Room at Assembly Rooms, George Street, Edinburgh

Chair & Minutes – Iain MacPhail, City of Edinburgh Council, City Centre Programme Manager       Contact Email – iain.macphail@edinburgh.gov.uk

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  • This is the 3rd quarterly meeting of the group. All are welcome, including members of the public with no other form of affiliation (other than a wish to see George Street achieve its potential). As with the two previous meetings there was a full house in attendance, which is testimony to the passion, commitment and level of engagement of the participants, and sheds light on the importance of the street and in helping it to achieve its potential.
  • Those present included a wide array of representatives including some from the local Community Council, heritage bodies, sustainable transport groups, disability groups, individual business interests, the local Business Improvement District, Council officials, bus companies, taxi firms, cyclists, the emergency services, and members of the public.

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  • The purpose of the year’s trial on George Street has been to test out the impacts on George Street (and on surrounding streets) when there is additional space given over to pedestrians, cyclists and for activity (not only during the summer and winter festivals, but year-round).
  • The Council has made strenuous efforts to make this the most transparent and grassroots-led project in the city. This can be seen in three key areas, related to the research package.

Continue reading